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Impressive architecture and timeless design

Its eye-catching design makes the Kempinski Hotel Airport Munich stand out from the crowd. The trend-setting architect Helmut Jahn design a hotel in the heart of one of the most modern Airports in Europe.

The Kempinski Hotel Airport München is an integral part of Munich Airport. It is located directly between Terminal 1 and 2. Following a construction period of only 20 months, the hotel opened its doors on May 17, 1994 - two years after the airport itself went into operation. Helmut Jahn has described the architecture of the Kempinski Hotel Airport Munich as airport specific: the hotel is part and parcel of the terminal structure, the service area and the surrounding landscape. A similar concept would never work in a city hotel, he says. As with his other projects, he also views form and function of the Kempinski Hotel in relation to urban environment. Each single unit in his design concepts forms a homogeneous part of the whole.

Kempinski Hotel Airport Munich


The Kempinski Hotel Airport München is an integral part of Munich Airport. It is located directly between Terminal 1 and 2. Following a construction period of only 20 months, the hotel opened its doors on May 17, 1994 - two years after the airport itself went into operation.


Architect of the hotel is German-born Helmut Jahn of the Chicago based Murphy/Jahn Architectural Group. Since 1974 Helmut Jahn has designed more than 55 buildings worldwide - museums, libraries, congress centres, corporate headquarters, airline terminals and hotels - monoliths of modern architecture. His unmistakable style has set the architectural tone for large international centres.


Helmut Jahn has described the architecture of the Kempinski Hotel Airport Munich as airport specific: the hotel is part and parcel of the terminal structure, the service area and the surrounding landscape. A similar concept would never work in a city hotel, he says. As with his other projects, he also views form and function of the Kempinski Hotel in relation to urban environment. Each single unit in his design concepts forms a homogeneous part of the whole.

But the Kempinski also represents a new type of hotel construction. This type of building calls neither for the traditional intimacy of the city hotel not the busy activity of the typical convention hotel. The Kempinski Hotel aims to highlight the style and adventure of travel.


Plans for the airport complex called for including the surrounding landscape in the design concept. The generous use of glass in the construction of the Kempinski Hotel purposely creates transparency and proximity to nature. And with the atrium Helmut Jahn has realised his credo to the ultimate. The usual division between inside and outside is suspended, technology and nature flow freely into one another. The glass walls of the front facade lend an impression of complete openness - special barriers are resolved to reveal an unimpeded panoramic view of infinite space for starting and landing aircrafts. The extension indoors of the outer landscape is suggested by the arrangement of rectangular and pyramidal forms of greening foliage. Starting from outside the building, they run diagonally through the atrium and continue on outside again - as do the giant glass cases filled with carefully arranged pots of geraniums, a contribution of the San Francisco landscape architect Peter Walker.


Examples of the open construction are apparent to guests on upper floors of the hotel, to passing pedestrians and from passing automobiles. The spacious garden in the style of Versailles and the tree-lined approach to the hotel entrance, belong to the architectural concept as a whole.


The commanding grandeur of steel and glass structure is especially apparent on passing through the hotel's main entrance. The glass skeleton of the building, the airy, luminous atrium covers an area of 1400 square meters. Glass walls are suspended from a filigree network of stainless steel spanning 40 by 24 meters. Light effects created by the elegant construction of the glass roof contribute a further dimension of grandeur. Pink granite and grey and white marble have been used in the atrium floor. Contemporary and most modern lighting system takes full effect at night - on the ground level and from above. The atrium is without doubt the absolute hub of the hotel. At the same time, the architect has conceived it as peripheral arena of the airport, a forum for hotel and flight guests, at once both private and public.


The two oblong blocks east and west of the atrium provide the reception desk on the ground level as well as restaurants and conference areas, and the guest rooms on the four upper levels. Borrowing from the architecture of the building, interior designer Jan Wichers has created an aesthetic of simple, lean proportions.


The futuristic architecture and the predominantly modern interior design lend the Kempinski Hotel Airport Munich the mark of a designer hotel. Functionalism at the Kempinski Hotel is augmented by a further quality: the chance to experience modern architectural design of international format that incorporates the surrounding landscape and that breathes and inspires.

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