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Some History

The picture perfect city of Bodrum is a place to while away an afternoon, wandering through cobbled streets, past white washed houses and colourful flower displays.

For those interested in discovering more about Turkeys passionate history, the hotel is a stone’s throw from many areas of interest, including the imposing medieval castle built by the Knights of Rhodes and two of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, the Mausoleum and Temple of Artemis in Ephesus and within easy reach of many beautiful Aegean villages which offer an insight into a time gone past.

Bodrum Castle    

The most prominent and impressive feature of Bodrum is the castle of St. Peter, of which the date back to the knights of St. John. Although belonging to the Catholic religion, care was denied to no-one. When the knights arrived they Instructed their builders to remove all usable materials from the tomb of King Mausolos as the castle construction began in the 1400's.

 

 

Mausoleum

The Mausoleum is Bodrums oldest antiquity and was built by Artemisia II in honour of her husband King Mausolos. Being one of the 7 Wonders of the Ancient World, Mausoleum still is the general term for a large tomb. The entire structurestood at over 50 meters in height. The first reliefs from the Mausoleum reached the British Museum in London in 1846, these included frescos and other objects.

 

 

Antique Theatre

The visitor will find the theater a comfortable place to sit and contemplate Bodrum, while watching boats leave and enter the harbor. Interesting features of the theater include a stone altar once used before plays for sacrifices to Dionyus, and several holes cut through some of the seats, probably used for sun shades. The theater could seat 13.000 people.

 

Ephesus

Turkey’s most impressive ancient site, with the famous Celsius library and the Amphitheatre, in 220 km north of Bodrum near the village of Selçuk, Ephesus is the most popular ancient site in south-western Turkey, with many acres of carefully excavated ruins present an unparalleled recreation of ancient splendour. This once thriving metropolis had as many as 250,000 inhabitants, and requires a full day to appreciate.

 

Pamukkale

Denizli’s natural thermal water source is a must-see unique threasure that Turkey offers. Although Denizli is not by the coast, Denizli means "a locality by the sea", referred to the abundance of underground water sources. Denizli is a rapidly growing industrial (especially textile) and touristic town with numerous beauties. Being a fertile region, the city has always been a cradle of civilizations succeeding one another. Luvians, Phrygians, Persians, Greeks and Romans are counted among the early civilizations; the later ones include the Byzantines, Seljuk and the Ottomans.

 

 

Didyma

Didyma, on the west coast of Turkey, was an important sacred site in the ancient Greek world. Its famous oracle and Temple of Apollo attracted crowds of pilgrims. Today, the temple's magnificent ruins still attract thousands of visitors - Didyma is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Turkey.

 

 

Milet

Miletus, near the coast of western Turkey, was one of the most important cities in the ancient Greek world, but eventually declined due to the silting up of its harbors. St. Paul stopped at Miletus on his Third Missionary Journey, on his way back to Jerusalem. There are many well-preserved ruins to be seen at the site, including a Temple of Apollo, a Byzantine church, and an important inscription relating to Jews.

 

 

Priene

Priene is an ancient Hellenistic city located just to the north of Miletus in western Turkey. It was an ancient Greek holy city and the home of an important temple of Athena. Priene's picturesque ruins include several columns of the Temple of Athena, much of the city wall, a well-preserved theater and a council chamber. The ruins are next to the modern town of Güllübahce.

 

 

 

 

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